Surrey Transportation Plan: Big Vision, Bold Moves

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City of Surrey is creating an innovative transportation plan that improves safety, tackles the climate crisis, and better connects people and places for the Surrey of the future.

Thank you to everyone who participated in Phase 3 engagement! We heard from over 5,000 members of the community and found strong support for the proposed direction. The draft Big Vision and four Bold Moves respond to the community values and current Surrey transportation experience that our citizens shared with us in the previous phase of public consultation.

What We Heard from the Community During Phase 3 Consultation

View the Engagement Findings Report to learn what we heard, including the results of an additional scientific probability survey.

To learn more, the following documents outline the Phase 3 engagement findings:

For more information on Phase 3 watch the project overview video and visit the four bold moves pages below.


Project Overview Video



Draft Vision Statement and Four Bold Moves


Updated Draft Vision

The Vision has been updated to address affordability, equity and accessibility based on Phase 3 feedback: Connecting a million people and places with safe, inclusive, convenient and green transportation choices for all.


Put Safety First

Value human life above all else in the transportation network by building streets that prioritize safety over the movement of vehicles.


Support 15-Minute Neighbourhoods

Complete the walk and bike networks for all Surrey residents that live within an easy walk or roll of their daily needs.


Connect Communities with Rapid Transit

Build a Rapid Transit Network that supports and connects all of Surrey’s communities.


Invest in Green Transportation Choices

Strengthen the multi-modal grid by prioritizing walking, cycling and transit before personal vehicles.



City of Surrey is creating an innovative transportation plan that improves safety, tackles the climate crisis, and better connects people and places for the Surrey of the future.

Thank you to everyone who participated in Phase 3 engagement! We heard from over 5,000 members of the community and found strong support for the proposed direction. The draft Big Vision and four Bold Moves respond to the community values and current Surrey transportation experience that our citizens shared with us in the previous phase of public consultation.

What We Heard from the Community During Phase 3 Consultation

View the Engagement Findings Report to learn what we heard, including the results of an additional scientific probability survey.

To learn more, the following documents outline the Phase 3 engagement findings:

For more information on Phase 3 watch the project overview video and visit the four bold moves pages below.


Project Overview Video



Draft Vision Statement and Four Bold Moves


Updated Draft Vision

The Vision has been updated to address affordability, equity and accessibility based on Phase 3 feedback: Connecting a million people and places with safe, inclusive, convenient and green transportation choices for all.


Put Safety First

Value human life above all else in the transportation network by building streets that prioritize safety over the movement of vehicles.


Support 15-Minute Neighbourhoods

Complete the walk and bike networks for all Surrey residents that live within an easy walk or roll of their daily needs.


Connect Communities with Rapid Transit

Build a Rapid Transit Network that supports and connects all of Surrey’s communities.


Invest in Green Transportation Choices

Strengthen the multi-modal grid by prioritizing walking, cycling and transit before personal vehicles.



Questions

Do you have a question about the transportation plan? We would be happy to respond to your question and will get back to you within a week.

Read our Moderation Policy to ensure your question meets our engagement etiquette and rules.

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    When will Surrey Planning incorporate the concept that more roads mean more cars? (https://newsbeezer.com/romaniaeng/historic-decision-in-austria-not-to-expand-the-motorway-network-more-roads-mean-even-more-traffic/) For example the 84th Ave extension through what little remains of central Surrey's greenspace - Bear Creek Park.

    Robert Winston asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your question. The City Transportation Plan looks to improve street connectivity within and between our communities facilitating multimodal access, and the extension of 84 Ave between King George Blvd and 140 St is consistent with this approach of reducing the distances for east-west connections in this area. Construction of European style motorways or highway style roads, as referenced in the linked article, is not part of the scope of the Surrey Transportation plan, we aim to build streets for people. The Highways within the City are owned and operated by the Provincial Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure.

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    Hello, I was wondering if there were any plans to add protected bike lanes on 100ave between 148st and 156st? It seems really weird that they made a protected bike lane from 100ave and 148st to King George station, protected bike lanes and non-protected bike lanes on 154st from 105ave to 100ave, and bike lanes continuing in all directions at 100ave and 156st but not connect them. From where I live, it is faster to bike to King George station compared to using public transit (and during rush hour i can almost match driving to King George station). However, during that section on my ride there are no bike lanes and not even a hard shoulder to ride on. This causes me to ride on the sidewalk because of all the time i have nearly been hit by a car on that stretch of road. The road is seems wide enough to allow for a protected bike lane while maintaining the amount of lanes currently on the road like when 100ave approaches 148st.

    James asked 8 months ago

    Hi James,

    Thank you for forwarding this request for protected bike lanes on 100 Avenue between 148 Street and 156 Street.  The timing of this request is good.  On January 31, 2022, Surrey Council approved the new 2022-2031 10 Year Servicing Plan: CR_2022-R023.pdf (surrey.ca).  The 10 Year Servicing Plan outlines the capital projects Surrey will build in the next ten years – including protected cycling facilities. 

    Protected bike lanes on 100 Avenue between 148 Street and 154 Street are included in the new plan (see page 46 in the corporate report – Figure 2.10 – Transportation Bicycle Infrastructure Program 1120 - project number 17317).  These are planned to be built in the short -term (in the next 2-5 years).  That only leaves a gap between 154 Street and 156 Street which we will work on filling in the future.

    You can view all the other plans for protected cycling facilities in the same report on page 46.

    Thanks again for your question. 

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    Why are there large undeveloped areas along king George and nodes or intersections along highway 10 Density should be higher like Vancouver on busy corridor roads

    Bewildered asked 10 months ago

    Hi,  thanks for your question and interest in the Surrey Transportation Plan!

    Within urban areas of Surrey, the City’s land use plans prioritizes higher densities in Town Centres and along rapid transit corridors, while designating moderate urban densities within other planned neighbourhoods. Much of both King George Boulevard and Highway 10 fall within existing land use plan areas and are designated for moderate to high densities. The City is also currently preparing a land use plan along King George Boulevard in Newton and will initiate plans for other areas as the need arises (often related to transit expansion). While such plans facilitate growth, the City does not control the timing of development, which is driven by market demand and decisions by individual land owners and developers.

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    Why has Surrey not 4 laned 128, 132, 140 & 144 all the way south to Hwy 10. In Newton it is a parking lot from 3pm to 6pm between 96 Ave and 64th Ave and King George and Scott Road. Most of these surface streets are still 2 lanes and if they were upgraded to 4 lanes, they still merge into 2 lanes at each end. So all the traffic has to merge from 4 lanes in to 2 lanes. Yet the area in question has been developed from farmland and bush to high density business and housing with no upgrades for transportation. King George just keeps getting more red lights and they are aren’t properly timed so traffic backs up from 92 Ave to 64 Ave now.

    David Berg asked 9 months ago

    Hi David, and thanks for your question and interest in the Surrey Transportation Plan. 

    Surrey is one of the fastest growing municipalities in BC and this growth has created some unique transportation challenges.  The Surrey Transportation plan is looking to address these challenges in a way that is equity-based, data-driven and benefits all road users.

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    Can sidewalks and crosswalks around schools be prioritized? South side of 60th Ave across from Latimer Road Elementary is MIA. Lights for the crosswalk crossing 192 would dramatically improve safety.

    Kelly asked 8 months ago

    Hi, thanks for your question and interest in the Surrey Transportation Plan.

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    Why is widening of 16th Ave not in any capital plan

    bob halsey asked 8 months ago


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    I live in Surrey, Scott road. I bike around a lot, is there a plan for a bike lane on scott road. I always feel at risk riding my bike in the same lane as other vehicles and there are constructions happening on the roads often.

    Dharamjeet Singh Ghuman asked 12 months ago

    One of the Five Pillars of the Plan approved by Mayor and Council is to prioritize Vision Zero Surrey, which aims to value human life above all else in the transportation network. The Vision Zero Plan recognizes cyclists are vulnerable road users and commits to taking equitable, data-driven, and evidence-based actions to ensure that City resources are spent where they will have the greatest impact on creating safer streets. More on Vision Zero Surrey can be found at https://www.surrey.ca/services-payments/parking-streets-transportation/vision-zero-surrey

    We heard in Phase 2 engagement in Fall 2020 that safety is the number one barrier to people walking, taking transit, and cycling more.  In response we developed a Big Vision and four Bold Moves, including Put Safety First and Invest in Green Transportation Choices. 

    In the next phase we will be developing Action Plans, including a Bike and Roll Action Plan that will include the City’s Strategic Cycling Network. This network will consist of protected infrastructure that will allow safe biking and rolling within and between Town Centres and within proximity to rapid transit on facilities that are separated from vehicles.  The Scott Road corridor has been identified as part of the strategic cycling network and is also included in TransLink’s Regional Major Bike Network.  However, due to road space constraints along Scott Road, building protected cycling facilities may not be possible. In this case we will be looking for opportunities to provide a safe cycling route along parallel corridors, such as 122 or 124 Street.

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    I want to know the sidewalk policy of surrey

    Manny asked 12 months ago

    Surrey has a number of policies related to the provision of sidewalks which can be found at https://www.surrey.ca/services-payments/parking-streets-transportation/walking-cycling-transit/walking along with the City’s 2011 Walking Plan. All new roads include sidewalks on both sides of the street, and sidewalks are usually constructed when we do road projects like widening a road or adding a bike lane on arterial roads. We also build new sidewalks, curb bulges and median refuges through our capital sidewalk program. However, there are currently far more sidewalk requests than can be accommodated, over 100 years of projects given the current budget. Therefore, we aim to prioritize locations based on:

    • Proximity to schools, transit service and active-use parks;
    • Higher densities of adjacent land use, such as multi-family residential and commercial lots
    • Ease of construction, such as lack of ditches, minimal impact on trees, or no need for retaining walls;
    • Completion of small gaps in connectivity;
    • Where development is not anticipated to complete the sidewalk in the near future; and
    • High Traffic Volumes.

     

    Within the boundaries of the City, there are approximately 620 km or roads with sidewalks on both sides, 590km of roads with sidewalks on one side, and 560 km of roads without any sidewalk. These numbers include local roads, higher volume collectors and arterials, and also provincial highways, some of which are unlikely to ever have sidewalks. 

     The new Surrey Transportation Plan phase 2 public engagement on Understanding Community Values indicated that 95% of Surrey residents want to walk more for daily trips than they do today. Two of the plan’s proposed Bold Moves – Put Safety First and Invest in Choices – directly address the need for increased investment in sidewalks. In the next phase of work, a draft Pedestrian Action Plan is being developed that includes significantly more funding to build the City’s sidewalk network. Look for the next round of consultation in the spring of 2022 to comment on the draft action plans. 

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    When is the final phase of this project in the project time table?

    Alireza asked about 1 year ago

    We will report to Council and the public on the Phase 3 Big Vision, Bold Moves engagement findings later this fall. After that the timeline is to bring forward a draft plan for a final round of consultation in the spring of 2022, followed by adoption by Council before the summer break. 

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    Is there a plan to widen 192nd street to four lanes with an interchange connecting to Highway 1. That would help ease traffic in the area and facilitate the movement of goods. Also it would help with increased vehicle traffic coming to and from the new Skytrain extension in Clayton.

    Shiv asked about 1 year ago

    A new interchange was identified on Highway 1 at 192 Street to improve access to the Port Kells industrial area and service the planned Anniedale Tynehead Neighbourhood Concept Plan (“NCP”) and future North Clayton NCP areas.  The new interchange would provide full movement access between 192 Street and Highway 1, replacing the existing Harvie Road interchange.  The project is part of previous commitments made by the Province’s Transportation Investment Corporation as part of the Highway 1 widening project.  Surrey’s contribution is expected to come from Anniedale Tynehead area-specific Development Cost Charges.  Timing for implementation is considered longer term - dependant on future development in the area and the City identifying improvements on 192 Street north of 74 Avenue to the interchange.  These improvements would come as part of a future edition of the 10-Year Servicing Plan.

Page last updated: 11 Mar 2022, 11:11 AM